rita hayworth

The Hollywood Canteen – a unique experience.

August 13, 2017 // 4 Comments

  Between 1941 and 1944 over 6,000 Hollywood workers entered the services, 1,500 of whom were registered actors and actresses. The ‘Hollywood Unit’ made training and recruitment films (and newsreels). One recruitment film starring Jimmy Stewart was said to have been responsible for 100,000 men joining the air force. Hundreds of stars, male and female, volunteered for the USO tours, [...]

The many loves of Rita Hayworth

August 7, 2017 // 2 Comments

  RITA HAYWORTH (1918-87) As a teenager Margarita Cansino (Rita Hayworth) was sexually abused by her abominable father, a Latin dancer named Eduardo Cansino, who not only abused her himself, but rented her out to his cronies. When she confided this to her husband Orson Welles he was rightly appalled. ‘He was a terrible man and she hated him’, said Welles. In her later years Rita took a [...]

COVER GIRL (1944) – the one and only Rita Hayworth.

April 15, 2017 // 0 Comments

                         Released in the closing years of World War Two, Cover Girl was an ordinary musical comedy featuring Gene Kelly and Rita Hayworth, supported by Phil Silvers, Otto Kruger and Eve Arden. With the singular exception of ‘Long Ago and Far Away’ the tunes are dull and mostly tuneless. The choreography, too, is routine and un-memorable, despite Kelly’s [...]

Hollywood & Abortions

April 1, 2017 // 2 Comments

  Over the past century or more that Hollywood has existed there has been no shortage of abortions performed on many of its aspiring young actresses. Unwanted offspring are not unique to the movie business, but they do tend to interfere with ambitions, not to mention reputations, more often in Tinsel Town than elsewhere. Careers have often been made (or saved) on an abortionist’s table. [...]

Feminine allure in the movies – 50 of the best

July 13, 2016 // 4 Comments

  These days if a man mentions that a woman looks ‘hot’ or ‘desirable’, he runs a very good chance of being labeled a ‘sexist’ by that annoying, nameless bunch that take it upon themselves to decide for the rest of us what is politically correct and what is not. Ever since I was old enough to realize that girls were much nicer to look at, more interesting to talk to, and [...]

Victor Mature – catnip to the ladies.

April 4, 2016 // 7 Comments

    From 1939 until 1984 Victor Mature appeared in 55 movies and one TV series, The Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1966). He wasn’t very good in many of them, and no-one was more aware of that than him. My Darling Clementine (1946) and Kiss of Death (1947) were clearly his best work, but too often he was asked to decorate sand and sandals melodramas and biblical films in which he [...]

My Top 10 screen beauties.

February 3, 2016 // 7 Comments

        Of course, everyone’s idea of what constitutes real beauty varies. I guess that is why we have so many pretty girls walking about with tattoos and bolts through their noses; why a large portion of the male population shave their heads or prefer to go unshaven (or both). Beauty truly is in the eye of the beholder and tastes change down the decades. The ‘cupid’s [...]

David Niven – a true gentleman.

December 22, 2015 // 3 Comments

  David Niven’s first wife, Primula Rollo, (known as Primmie) died in a tragic household accident several months before he made The Bishop’s Wife in 1947. The couple had been married since 1940 and were visiting Tyrone Power’s home when a game of ‘hide and seek’ was suggested by someone. In the dark Primmie opened what she thought was a closet door, but happened to be [...]

What’s in a Name – Part Two?

August 4, 2015 // 0 Comments

  Part Two of ‘What’s in a Name?’ features some of the more stupid names thought up by the studios in their endeavours to create phony images for their stars. One of the silliest was the one they lumbered poor Ann Sheridan with – The Oomph Girl. She simply did not get it, and who could blame her. ‘Oomph’ is what a fat man says when he leans over to tie his shoelace in a telephone [...]

A few snippets from Frank Langella.

July 20, 2015 // 2 Comments

  Oscar-nominated actor Frank Langella published his most entertaining biography titled, Dropped Names: Famous Men & Women as I Knew Them, in 2013. It is a scathing one that pulls few, if any, punches. Here are a few snippets from it, some of his observations down the decades, along with the occasional added comment that might be of interest. Bancroft, Anne:        Langella [...]
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