orson welles

MOVIE TRIVIA – PT48.

August 28, 2018 // 6 Comments

Linda & Tom Jones Director Tim Burton went backstage after one of Tom Jones’ Vegas performances and asked the Welsh Wailer if he would like to be in his movie Mars Attacks! (1996). Tom and his three back-up singers at that time, Darelle Porter Holden, Christi Black and Sharon Hendrix, all made it into the picture. Tom’s manager once revealed in an interview, much to the displeasure of the [...]

MOVIE TRIVIA – PT39.

August 2, 2018 // 6 Comments

                  John Wayne accepts Gary Cooper’s Oscar for High Noon John Wayne and Ward Bond, two staunch supporters of the Senator McCarthy witch-hunts of the late forties and early fifties, were incensed over Carl Foreman’s screenplay for High Noon (1952), which they knew was a thinly disguised allegory for the HUAC persecutions. Both actors actually ordered Gary Cooper to [...]

MOVIE TRIVIA – PT 29.

July 5, 2018 // 0 Comments

                             Samuel L. Jackson in Pulp Fiction Why did John Travolta get nominated for Best Actor in Pulp Fiction (1994), while Samuel L Jackson had to settle for the lesser Supporting Actor nomination? And how did the mediocre performance by Martin Landau in Ed Wood win out over Jackson’s assassin in Pulp Fiction? And why was Denzel Washington asked by the now [...]

MOVIE TRIVIA – PT 20.

June 9, 2018 // 2 Comments

                           Orson Welles circa 1938 The Night That Panicked America (1975) was a tele-movie about the legendary 1938 radio broadcast by Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre group, of a version of The War of the Worlds, that ‘millions of Americans, supposedly, took seriously’, believing the USA was under attack by aliens. The truth of the matter is much different, [...]

FORTIES MOVIE TRIVIA – PT 6.

March 11, 2018 // 10 Comments

                     George Raft George Raft turned down the leads in High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon (both in 1941), thereby giving Humphrey Bogart’s career a huge kick-start. Contrary to public opinion though, he never turned down Casablanca (1942). Why? Because he was never offered it. There are many myths and a lot of folklore surrounding that wonderful movie and that is just [...]

The many loves of Rita Hayworth

August 7, 2017 // 4 Comments

  RITA HAYWORTH (1918-87) As a teenager Margarita Cansino (Rita Hayworth) was sexually abused by her abominable father, a Latin dancer named Eduardo Cansino, who not only abused her himself, but rented her out to his cronies. When she confided this to her husband Orson Welles he was rightly appalled. ‘He was a terrible man and she hated him’, said Welles. In her later years Rita took a [...]

COVER GIRL (1944) – the one and only Rita Hayworth.

April 15, 2017 // 0 Comments

                         Released in the closing years of World War Two, Cover Girl was an ordinary musical comedy featuring Gene Kelly and Rita Hayworth, supported by Phil Silvers, Otto Kruger and Eve Arden. With the singular exception of ‘Long Ago and Far Away’ the tunes are dull and mostly tuneless. The choreography, too, is routine and un-memorable, despite Kelly’s [...]

WAMPAS Baby Stars – PT5 (1926)

December 28, 2016 // 4 Comments

  MARY ASTOR (1906-87)                            1526 For some reason 1926 was quite a year for WAMPAS Baby Stars. Most of them ended up being major movie stars. Mary Astor is the first of these. Born Lucile Langhanke, her career started in 1921 and lasted over forty years and 154 screen credits. These included such classics as Red Dust (1932), Dodsworth (1936), [...]

Joseph Cotten & Deanna Durbin – lovers or not?

January 27, 2016 // 12 Comments

  In 2013, singer/actress Deanna Durbin passed away at the age of 91 in her adopted country, France. Actor Joseph Cotten had preceded her by nearly twenty years. Way back in 1943, Hollywood gossip columnist Hedda Hopper set the cat among the pigeons when she wrote that Deanna and Joe, both married to others at the time, had spent the night together in a room at Universal studios. The [...]

Did you know? Points of interest Pt. 22.

November 7, 2015 // 0 Comments

  For the life of me I cannot understand why critics rave about Hitchcock’s 1958 so-called ‘classic’ Vertigo. I watched it again yesterday and my opinion of it, if anything, was reinforced. It is as ordinary as dishwater. Take the opening sequence, for example. It is just plain stupid. A criminal is fleeing across rooftops, pursued by a uniformed policeman who is, in turn, followed by [...]
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